Cancer Prevention: How Oncologists Prevent Cancer

“Most people are unaware that certain viruses can cause cancer and that there are available vaccines specifically to prevent some cancers. I’m partnering with The Prevent Cancer Foundation for their campaign ‘Think About the Link’ aimed at letting people know how important it is to get vaccinated for HPV (the virus that accounts for 70 percent of cervical cancers), hepatitis B, and hepatitis C.” —Erich M. Sturgis, MD, a professor in the department of head and neck surgery at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. These are 10 vaccine myths you can safely ignore.

 

“It’s important to be proactive regarding surveillance for cancer. Many are curable or have a better outcome when caught early. In addition, do regular examinations on yourself at home and get to know your own body well. Any concerns? Bring them up with your doctor at your next check-up.” —Justin Piasecki, MD, skin cancer surgeon

 

“Multiple studies, including a recent randomized trial published in JAMA, suggest that the Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil can help prevent cancer. I try to follow this by eating a whole-foods plant-based diet that includes broccoli, turmeric, and garlic and limits refined sugar, refined carbohydrates, saturated animal fats, and toxic chemicals, and pesticides.” —Matthew McCurdy, MD, PhD, a radiation oncologist at the Austin Cancer Center

 

“Your immune system needs to be in optimal condition to seek out and destroy cancer cells. Having a calm lifestyle will promote a stronger immune system. If your body is not preoccupied with the physical and emotional effects of life’s little battles, your immune system can better focus on healing and protecting you. One thing I practice and highly recommend is controlling your stress level, especially about things that are out of your control. There will always be legitimate reasons to be worrisome or angry. But if your anxiety will not fix the situation, then accept, adapt, and resolve things the best way you can.” —Amy Lee, PhD, associate director for research and chair in basic science in cancer research at USC’s Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center

 

“Eating too much sugar and junk food can cause fat to build up in your liver, which can cause liver damage and increase the risk of liver cancer. It has been predicted that this non-alcoholic fatty liver disease will be the leading cause of liver cancer and the rate of liver cancer will increase significantly in a few years.” —Homayoon Sanati, MD, medical director of the MemorialCare Breast Cancer Center at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center in Fountain Valley, California. These are 15 cancer symptoms women are likely to ignore.